robotsandfrippary:

cheshiretiffy:

the-goddamazon:

thelonelyskeptic:

atopfourthwall:

kristaferanka:

ramonasflower:

Infinite Crisis - "What Do You Fight For?"

Peace

holy shit, diana.

That’s Doomsday, the dude who killed Superman.

She’s holding back, IMHO.

"If you need to stop an asteroid, you call Superman. If you need to solve a mystery, you call Batman. But if you need to end a war, you call Wonder Woman." - Gail Simone

I got wet watching this. The way she shrugs off that hit like “Aiight, lehgo” was just…yessssss.

Goddamn this CG is gorgeous. You can tell it’s CG, but they put so much detail into the skins. There is cellulite on her thigh! It’s not some weird leg-sausage, it’s HUMAN (I know she’s an Amazon but still).

I keep wondering what truth she needs to ask him.

posted September 21 with 72,967 notes - via - source - reblog

Day 1:  Hollywood Studios.  Not a whole lot of good pictures taken, and it’s been a kind of crappy day.  At least the cabins are nice.  (I GOT THE TOP BUNK)

so here’s a selfie with my new hat and magic band, PLUS MY SPOOKY SCARY SKELETON SHIRT

posted September 21 with 6 notes - reblog

winkbooks:

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter — Notes from the Zombie Apocalypse

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter
by Lost Zombies
Chronicle
2011, 160 pages, 8 x 10 x 0.5 inches
$15 Buy a copy on Amazon

Some of my favorite things about zombie movies are the details of the changed world. The dead grass, broken windows, toppled telephone poles, abandoned cars with missing wheels and trunks left open, boarded-up buildings, spent ammo shells, and other signs of struggle and desperation serve to create a fascinatingly creepy environment.

And that’s why I like Dead Inside: Do Not Enter so much. The book consists entirely of letters, hand-written warnings, and pages torn from journal entries that were written during the zombie pandemic. The notes are on matchbooks, napkins, photographs, advertisements, shopping lists, road maps, scraps of cardboard, and gum wrappers. Some of the notes are written with pen and pencil, others are written with lipstick, burnt wood, crayons, and blood.

The messages of the notes themselves tell the tale of the rise of the zombie pandemic, from tentative, joking questions about a “really bad flu,” escalating to confused panic, and later to grim acceptance of the new reality that the survivors now must live in.

In the introduction to Dead Inside, we learn that these notes had been found in a Dora the Explorer backpack. The first note presented in the book was written by the man who killed the owner of the backpack, a girl who was about 10 years old and had been bitten by a zombie (but had not yet turned into one). The man wrote “I opened her backpack and found all these notes and letters. This stuff is poisonous. No one in their right mind should read it. Reading this is like looking into the sun.” – Mark Frauenfelder

September 16, 2014

posted September 20 with 15,013 notes - via - source - reblog

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

posted September 20 with 93,782 notes - via - source - reblog
song title: PROBLEM
artist: VOCALOID RUBY with 118,342 plays

subasequel:

axtryk:

NEW STRONG ENGLISH VOCALOID ‘RUBY” SHES SO FUCKING GOO)D OPUTS ALL THE REST TO SHAME

i honestly thought that this was a joke post like this had to be a joke and i hit play and i legit was like “that sax is supposed to be the voice isn’t it like that’s the joke, engloids sound like stuffy honk machines”

AND THEN THE MIRACLE GIRL GRACED MY EARS HOLY SHIT HOLY SHIT THERE IT IS THERE IT IS THERE IT IS THE COHERENT CLEAR-VOICED ENGLOID MAKING ALL THE OTHERS WEAR DUNCE CAPS SHE’S THE QUEEN ENG I MIGHT ACTUALLY HAVE TO START CARING ABOUT VOCALOID AGAIN JESUS CHRIST

posted September 20 with 19,559 notes - via - source - reblog

mitsumurata:

eridongs:

perrierra:

what if instead of “show yourselves, corrupted children, I am the voice of forgiveness that will eliminate your calamitous forms” it was

"let’s do this shit"

image

and as an added bonus:

image

petition to get cr1tikal to play off

posted September 20 with 5,126 notes - via - source - reblog

enattendantlesoleil:

me during classes

  • "that’s racist"
  • "that’s sexist"
  • "there are more than two genders"
  • "ok but could we maybe not use that word"
  • "that’s ableist"
  • "there aren’t enough girls in here"
posted September 20 with 60,135 notes - via - source - reblog
posted September 20 with 14,321 notes - via - source - reblog

Don’t trust her.

outofcontextdnd:

-A warning about our Chaotic Neutral Rogue given by the Chaotic Evil Sorcerer

posted September 19 with 725 notes - via - source - reblog

policymic:

American Indian Rapper SupaMan was just named as an MTV Artist of the Week

The news: Christian Parrish Takes the Gun. Remember his name.

The Apsáalooke American Indian hails from the Crow Nation Reservation near Billings, Mont., and on March 21, the MTV Iggy blog named him Artist of the Week from among hundreds of competitors.

What makes him special? Well, he raps under the name “SupaMan,” he sings, he makes crazy drum loops, he’s a champion powwow fancy dancer and sometimes, if you’re lucky, he does all four at the same time.

Read more | Follow policymic

posted September 19 with 21,555 notes - via - source - reblog

[timmy’s dad voice]

bendis

posted September 19 with - reblog

Basically the Crock/Nguyen family in Young Justice are more functional than my family is because at least, in their own, fucked up way, they all fucking care about one another.
I swear, I think my family spends more time trying to kill each other.

posted September 18 with 1 note - reblog

how the hell did my mom make me feel bad for being dehydrated

posted September 17 with - reblog
posted September 17 with 103 notes - via - source - reblog

batwedgies:

i cant believe i just made this

posted September 17 with 38 notes - via - source - reblog
xoxo